Time to Go..

View from the Beach, 2020

“What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.”

from “Little Gidding”, T.S. Eliot

I have decided to end this photoblog, it ran for 11 years in various forms but as they say, “All good things come to an end”.

From the begining, it was a place where I shared pictures of the odd things which I found – thank you for visiting my corner of the Interweb – and the insights which you shared.

Take it easy!

Bee in the Garden, West Sussex

Bumble Bee, West Sussex – August 2021

Bees are harder to photograph than you might think (I’ve written that before – I know). Perhaps informed by Disney and their slightly chubby appearance, I tended to think of them as rather leisurely, but as I tried to follow their movements, I came to realise how purposeful they are: every movement they make is for gathering nectar or moving on to the next flower. They are tireless. And they work without anyone directing them, although I know they do an intricate dance back at the hive to tell other bees where there is nectar.

I don’t think I would be a good bee, but I admire them.

Sorry You’re Leaving, Bloomsbury

Leaving Card, Bloomsbury, London – 2005

Back in the mists of time, my favourite way to spend a day, was wandering around London. I found this in Bloomsbury, an area of central London near the British Museum. There are lots of small offices connected with the media and adertising – and I saw this card by the entrace to one of them. Looking at it, I’m wondering whether it fell deiberately or by mistake!

Petal, San Salvador

Petal, San Salvador, El Salvador – September 2006

As I remember it, I took this photo not long after I arrived in El Salvador.

In the “wet” season, it rains every afternoon – usually at about 4pm. Usually, being the operative word, because sometimes – like when you have work to do or places to go – it comes down early. The rain clouds seem to roll down from above San Salvador (a big volcano as well as the capitol of the country) and then you can see everyone speed up what they are doing so that they can be indoors when the rain falls: workmen pack their tools, livestock get undercover and old women move with remarkable pace, all glancing over their shoulders at the volcano as they go.

I have lost count the number of times I got soaked, sometimes I ended up buying a new shirt when I got to destination, but everytime, I got wet to the point where water would stream off me when I got undercover.

But, soon after the “dry” season begins in November, you find yourself missing the rain. The lush, green landscape slowly goes yellow and everything gets a layer of dust on it. Until March, when it starts all over again!

I took this with my Minolta X1, which was hopeless for anything that moved, but here, that wasn’t a problem!

Sunbeams, Shoreham Beach

Sunbeams, Shoreham Beach, West Sussex – September 2020

A photograph from the end of last summer. It is a bit “decorative” or new age book cover’ish (“The Wisdom of Pebbles”) – but I still quite like it.

And I took it with the simplest camera I own. There is probably a lesson in there somewhere.

The Shard, London

The Shard, London 2020

Although I am scared of heights, I like going up tall buildings. Whenever I visit a new city, I’ll search for a tall building to look at it from.

But I’ve never been up The Shard. So I couldn’t say whether it was worth the entry fee. In a slightly connected way, I can recommend St Paul’s Cathedral – there is a whole post I could do about that! As an aside, my favourite view of London is from Parliament Hill.

It feels a bit poignent, because I took this early last year before the lockdown.

Empty Beach, Shoreham-by-Sea

Empty Beach, Shoreham Beach, West Sussex – May 2021

“I must go down to the sea again, to the lonely sea and sky…”

Sorry, I thought I would start with a bit of John Masefield. 🙂

This photo is only a couple of weeks old, but the now weather has shifted from “sort-of-summer” to “definitely summer”. So it is long gone (although it isn’t).

When I lived here 40 years ago, I was always disappointed that the sea looked green rather than the blue you see in films. And I wished the shingle was sand. But now, I’m glad that it isn’t: the green is rather pleasing and the waves hiss when they strike the pebbles!

Deer and her Fawn, Horsham

Deer and Fawn, Horsham – June 2021

I live in a rural area, so when I go for a walk, I usually see trees and animals, rather than buildings and people. And I tend to find myself photographing the same things, over and over – the memorial tree which I posted before is a case in point. But sometimes, if i’m lucky, I see something different. I was walking along the edge of this field, when I saw this deer looking back at me. I was sure that she would just bolt away, but no, she just stared at me. So I dug out my phone and took some photos. And then, something moved next to her and I realised – she had a fawn with her!

I’m sorry the quality isn’t great, but it was getting dark, I was using a phone and the deer was 30 feet away (I think). So, perhaps instead of wishing I had a better camera with me, I should just be glad that the deer let me see them at all.

“Catsy” Cat, Wokingham

“Catsy” Cat, Wokingham – October 2017

I found this graffiti cat outside the flat where I lived in Wokingham (Berkshire, UK). At the time, as you can see, I took a photo of it – but didn’t really think any more about it. But then I read this news story on the bbc website about this street artist – Catsy, who it turns out does his work in – Wokingham. Well at least now, the mystery is over!

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-57284790